What You Should Know About Child Support in North Carolina

child supportLike most states, North Carolina uses child support guidelines to help simplify the process of determining child support. North Carolina’s guidelines are based on an income shares model, which is predicated on the concept that the child should receive the same proportion of parental income that he/she would receive if the parents lived together. The North Carolina Child Support Guidelines currently in effect provide a formula for determining the presumptive child support obligation for parents whose combined gross income is $300,000 per year ($25,000 per month) or less. The child support guidelines are reviewed and updated at least once every four years to ensure they result in reasonable child support awards.

The guidelines are designed to work in conjunction with three different worksheets that accompany the guidelines. One of these three worksheets must be used when calculating support under the guidelines. The appropriate worksheet will depend on the parties’ child custody arrangement.

Worksheet A should be used when a parent has sole or primary physical custody (meaning one parent has the child/children for 243 or more nights of the year); Worksheet B should be used when the parents share child custody (each parent has the child/children for at least 123 nights per year); and Worksheet C should be used when there are two or more children and the parents split primary custody of the children. The worksheets allow other variables to be factored into the calculation of child support, including child care costs paid by a parent due to employment or job-search, health insurance paid by a parent for the child, and either parent’s responsibility for the support of any other children.

Most child support matters fall within the scope of the child support guidelines. However, there are exceptions. When the parties’ combined income exceeds $300,000 per year, the child support guidelines do not apply, and child support must be determined on an individual case basis. In these cases, unless the parties reach an agreement, the court must conduct a hearing and set child support in such amount to meet the reasonable needs of the child for health, education and maintenance, with due regard given to the estates, earnings and conditions of the parties, the accustomed standard of living of the child and the parties, and the other facts and circumstances of the particular case.

Even when the parties’ combined gross income falls within the guidelines, special circumstances may exist that provide a basis for a party to seek, or a court to determine, that there should be a deviation from the child support guidelines. Some such circumstances include: when a child has special needs and the amount of support calculated using the guidelines would not meet the needs of the child; when a parent is paying 100% of the child support obligation and 100% of the child’s health insurance premium; or, when a parent is paying child support for two or more families pursuant to the terms of two or more separation agreements, voluntary support agreements, or court orders.

Court hearings to determine child support can be lengthy proceedings that may require extensive evidence to be presented regarding incomes, income earning ability, expenses, standard of living, and other relevant factors. However, child support does not have to be set by the court. Regardless of incomes or other factors, the parties have the option of reaching an agreement on child support and settling the matter outside of court. Whether your matter is settled amicably or requires a contested court hearing, it is recommended that you retain an experienced and qualified family law attorney to represent you throughout your child support matter. Being represented by counsel can ensure that your legal and financial interests are protected during negotiations and beyond, and that child support is set in an amount that is fair to both parties and the child.

The family law attorneys at Siemens Family Law Group provide representation in a wide array of divorce and family related legal matters, including child support. If you need assistance in making an initial determination of child support, or would like to seek an increase or decrease in an existing child support obligation, our experienced and dedicated attorneys can help. We are committed to providing compassionate guidance and effective advocacy that has earned us a reputation as one of Asheville’s premier family law firms.

This article is intended for information purposes only and is not to be considered or substituted as legal advice. This article is based on North Carolina laws in effect at the time of posting.